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Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Peer Reviewed Journal Article, 2019

Bangladesh is one of the countries most vulnerable to climate change. Gendered vulnerability and its implications for people’s ability to cope with and adapt to climatic stressors was investigated in four poor rural communities in Dimla, Kaunia, Hatibandha, and Patgram upazilas (sub-districts) in Rangpur division in the lower Teesta basin area in northwest Bangladesh.

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Peer Reviewed Journal Article, 2019

This paper explores the varied narratives of vulnerabilities faced by different groups of people in Hindu Kush Himalayas (HKH) region in the Darjeeling Hills, in West Bengal, shaped by their identities that are ever evolving. Identities come with deep-rooted structures of class, caste/ethnic group, history and geographic location.

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Peer Reviewed Journal Article, 2019

The paper touches on the complex intersectionalities that are underplay in certain regions which further contribute to differential vulnerabilities. It seeks to understand the causalities in differential resources access, institutional support and power disparities and how these intersect with predisposed roles and responsibilities. The paper emphasises on the role of ethnicity, poverty and political identity in shaping gender vulnerabilities in the Eastern Himalayan context.

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Peer Reviewed Journal Article, 2019

This paper is based on a literature review and takes the standpoint that not only is gender a powerful and pervasive contextual condition, but that it intersects with other contextual conditions to shape vulnerabilities. Further, gender and other contextual conditions also influence and are influenced by socioeconomic drivers of change to produce differential gendered vulnerabilities.

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Peer Reviewed Journal Article, 2019

This paper is based on a literature review and takes the standpoint that not only is gender a powerful and pervasive contextual condition, but that it intersects with other contextual conditions to shape vulnerabilities. Further, gender and other contextual conditions also influence and are influenced by socioeconomic drivers of change to produce differential gendered vulnerabilities.

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Peer Reviewed Journal Article, 2019

This study aimed at better understanding the nature and types of socio-economic drivers and social vulnerabilities in the context of increasing climatic stresses in four river basins in the Hindu Kush Himalaya (HKH) region. A multidimensional, contextual and integrated approach has been applied using participatory qualitative tools and techniques to identify major socio-economic drivers and conditions along with climatic factors in upstream, midstream and downstream of the river basins.

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Peer Reviewed Journal Article, 2019

Worldwide, the demand for energy has increased significantly in last two decades, leading to an increased use of non-renewable energy resources. The global agenda aims to reduce the carbon intensity of energy in long-term climate change mitigation strategies, and to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 7 (SDG-7) on affordable and clean energy.

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Peer Reviewed Journal Article, 2019

South Asia is one of the most flood-affected regions in the world. In 2010, almost 45 million people were considered to be exposed to flooding, which accounted for almost 65% of the total global flood exposed population for that year

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Peer Reviewed Journal Article, 2019

Based on gender analysis of vulnerable populations living in different stretches of Gandaki river basin in the Hindu Kush Himalaya region, this paper presents issues on gendered vulnerabilities and suggests possible adaptation measures. Evidence based on a participatory assessment of socioeconomic drivers and conditions leading to vulnerabilities and gender analysis of 107 Focus Group Discussions with homogenous groups of women and men belonging to various vulnerable social groups at up, mid and downstream of the basin form primary data source.

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Peer Reviewed Journal Article, 2019

Vulnerability to climate change is a multi-layered and multi-faceted phenomena, determined by both biophysical and socio-economic factors, leading to differential vulnerabilities for women and men from different categories, groups and locations.

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